A shift in direction

Everyone,

Longtime watchers of this blog have surely realized that, in the past few months, there has been a lull in its output, and particularly in what is supposed to be its bread and butter: Beatles books reviewed and analyzed via the standards of historical methodology. This is not due to lack of interest in the subject either on my part, or on Karen’s: I have greatly appreciated all the likes, shares, new followers, and posters we have garnered over the existence of the blog, and genuinely enjoyed the in-depth, nuanced discussions our posters have provided.

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Lennon Audio Diaries

(The following is part of a piece I wrote a few years ago for Hey Dullblog. I thought our readers here would like to have a kick at the can during the post-Christmas lull. Looking forward to your comments. ~Karen) 

In the fall of 1979, John sat down with a tape recorder and began to tell his life story.  But these Lennon audio diaries were a non-starter: in true Lennon fashion, he got bored after 1.25 minutes and let his thoughts drift to his usual preoccupations—Paul McCartney, his mother Julia, and his fear of professional redundancy.

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The Beatles and the Phenomenology of Fame

To declare that the Beatles were, from 1963 on, famous, is a mind-numbingly obvious statement. For all of Beatles historiography’s numerous debates, the Fab Four’s stratospheric amount of fame — both as a quartet and as individuals — is unquestioned. Countless anecdotes, stories and direct comments from Lennon, McCartney, Harrison and Starr, as well as others close to them, reinforce that fame impacted them as individuals and as a group; influencing their friendships, their family relations, their attempts to live semi-normal lives, and their futures. Fame was also an element contributing to the tragedies of the stabbing attack on George Harrison and the murder of John Lennon.

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Introversion/Extroversion, and Beatles’ Conflict: A Dialogue

~by Karen and Erin

Introduction

Karen

Some time ago, Erin and I began a discussion about how the perception of conflict between Paul and the other three Beatles, particularly in the days prior to the band’s demise, has essentially been characterized by many  biographers as an outcome of Paul’s perfectionism.  In our opinion, however, the “Paul was too bossy” trope–a view often promulgated by the other three Beatles, as it happens–was simply too convenient and in its gross oversimplification of creative conflict, woefully inaccurate.  It seemed more likely that the conflicts within the group, and between Paul and George in particular, were due–at least in part–to their innately different creative and interpersonal styles.  The Beatles are not unique in assigning false attributions to one another in conflict situations; as a matter of fact,  many people have a tendency to assign pejorative labels to behaviours which they don’t understand, find frustrating, and get in the way of their own creative needs. Continue reading